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How Cyber Attackers Use The Coronavirus to Steal Your Data

Coronavirus Email Scams

The recent coronavirus outbreak has motivated cybercriminals to send virus related malware attacks across the world.

Phishing emails claiming to possess information on protecting against the virus have appeared, spreading misinformation and malicious software. These emails encourage victims to open attached documents containing malware that can freeze or completely steal valuable data.

Scammers use fear and uncertainty to manipulate victims into infecting their computer with malware. However, incorporating tragic events, potential pandemics or natural disasters into their attacks is nothing new.

Beware of Phishing After Any Big Event

Attackers customize phishing emails to current or upcoming events like tax season, hurricane season, and holidays. Regardless of the occasion, the goal is the same: to access valuable information. The attacks prey on people’s desperation for answers and suggest that they have can give them to you.

Furthermore, there have been cases of scams emerging in places like Michigan and New York. Officials in these states are warning residents to be vigilant of emails asking for donations or personal payment card information.

Coronavirus scam emails were popping up in early February which prompted Michigan’s Department of Health and Human Services to warn citizens on their dangers.

The Federal Trade Commission even sent out a memorandum advising people on how to spot email scams and stay safe online.

Additionally, the FTC says cyber criminals could be setting up fraudulent websites that sell fake products using illegitimate emails, social media posts and texts to trick people into sending them money or personal information.

An example of a phishing email scam offering fake information about COVID-19.

Common attributes of a fake email are spelling and/or grammar errors.
If you receive a suspicious link, hover your cursor over it to view the destination url.

Protecting Against Coronavirus Phishing Scams

Here are some tips recommended by the FTC to keep safe against scammers:

1) Be suspicious of emails claiming to be from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or anyone purporting to be an “expert” with information on the virus.

2) Avoid emails that allude to any “investment opportunities.” Social scams will promote products claiming they can cure, detect, treat or prevent the disease are fake.

3) If you’re going to donate, do the proper research into the organization and payment method. Don’t be pressured to donate and especially if it’s through an email link.

4) Ignore offers for vaccinations. Ads that say they have the cure or treatment for coronavirus are probably scams. Any medical breakthrough will be announced on mainstream media networks.

5) For up-to-date information on the virus visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO)

Don’t Be Misled

These scams will continue to spread and they won’t go away any time in the near future. In fact, scammers will certainly take greater advantage of the misinformation and fear from media coverage.

Moreover, cyber scammers in China were reported sending malicious emails containing malware. It’s difficult to protect yourself from these types of attacks but

Threat actors also targeted users in Japan with a campaign that spread malicious documents with supposed information on the virus.

Unsurprisingly, these social engineers even sent emails impersonating the CDC to lure unsuspecting users into malware traps.

The Coronavirus is a real threat but it’s important to keep a level head and not expose yourself to even greater harm online.

Ultimately, even Facebook has begun planning to ward off misinformation on the virus. Other social media platforms have voiced concern about the spread of false claims on their platforms as well.

The virus has attracted the attention of a global audience but that doesn’t mean you have to fall victim to those looking to profit off of that attention.

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